helmetNews & Events

Updated 10/09/2016
It is with much pride in my heart but yet a small tear in the corner of my eye I am pleased to tell you that this era for MOVMX comes to a close while giving way to a new and exciting future of vintage motocross. After a few years of searching for just the right people to take the helm of the Missouri Vintage Motocross series, I am very happy to announce that Jim and Cathy Schultz of Soaring Eagle Promotions will be taking over the series for the 2017 season and beyond.

Jim and Cathy are the past operators of Eagles’ Roost MX in Halltown, or as many of us knew it back in the day as Possum Hollow. Jim took that track and brought it back from a shambles and made it a very respectable track once again only to have his contract not renewed once it was in good running order. Jim has recently been able to team up with a new track that is under construction in southern Missouri and his desire to finish what he started is very much alive.

To be a race promoter means so many things and trust me when I say that not just anyone can do it, which is why it has taken me a long time to find just the right fit. There have been discussions with several really good people about it over the years, but this one just feels right. I, admittedly, have been losing the passion and desire for some time but could not just let the series that I have invested the last 18 years of my life to just dwindle away into the past. There are way too many good people with way too much money in their toys who want to race to just shut it down. There is still a bright future for this series and everyone who supports it.

We have just two races left this year and I hope that you will attend and come meet Jim and Cathy. They are GREAT folks and are developing some big plans for MOVMX. I ask that you show them all the support that you have shown me over the years. It will be a bit bumpy in the beginning I’m sure, but most of you don’t remember the origins of MOVMX and to say that was a bit bumpy would be an understatement for sure.

The last race at Greenwood will be THE last race at Greenwood. With the passing of the torch too the Schultz’s, this does mean that there will be no more motocross races at the Harper Farm in Greenwood. November 16 will be the final motocross event to be held at this location.

As many of you know Sherri and I have had a very successful year for us personally and many things have happened to change the dynamic of our lives, and we are both very comfortable that this is the right thing to do at the right time. The pride I have in the success of this series over the years and the memories of so many families who have brought their kids up thru it, how many ex racers have come back to relive their youth, and how many friends have been made over the years is just a feeling that you can’t get by sitting back and watching things happen. With a satisfaction that this is a very good turn for MOVMX, believe me this is a decision that brings me many emotions.

Curtis Harper

 

MOVMXers, A bit of a long read, but please take a minute.

The soft science of farm field racing

Every year about this time, several questions always emerge. What tracks will be on the tour next year? Will you be adding more classes? What determines if someone has to move up to the next class?

Well, for question one: Right now I have not yet determined but I will most likely be most of the same as 2015.

For #2, No I will not be adding any more classes. Changing the year structure is not yet warranted at this point, so it will stay as is for now.

#3, this one is always some what difficult to explain how it works. Generally it is considered that if you win your class, you move up. This is not always the case.

If you put in a dominating performance like Jeremy Theis did, by working hard and practicing and getting better and winning every moto except one all year, in the largest class on the schedule then yes you have earned the move up to expert. The track skills and discipline warrant the move. Jeremy is the only rider to make the move to Expert this year.

However on the other hand if you accumulate points by making all the races that no one else does and you are primarily the only one in your class that does not necessarily mean you will move up. Especially if you have not won a single moto throughout the entire season and are one of the slowest riders in the series. There are riders out there who self admittedly are lifetime novice riders. They are some of the most passionate about the sport with the most aggressive grasp of stats and specifications of anyone. These guys are the root of the sport.

On the middle ground are a couple of classes of novices, the PV+50 for example, that have several consistent riders and they have had good battles all year and swapped wins amongst several riders, one rider edging out by maybe 10 points on the year. These are some of the greatest races to watch, but that doesn’t mean they are required to move to Intermediate, thus breaking up a good pairing of riders skills and forcing someone to ride above their head. The general line choice, braking points and jumping distances are the reason they are still novice. To force one of them up to intermediate, which means they will at some point be on the track with experts is potentially disastrous.

What are the determining factors? To me primarily it is speed and skill. I try very hard to keep speeds and abilities together. Every body pays the same entry fees and has the right to get the best racing experience they can. For instance; Let’s say Henrik Svenson, Tim Turnbull, Joe Burke, Jeff Hockett and Bill Graham (Arguably the fastest bunch of regulars I could put together) are all on the line together and two to three laps in there are still four or five guys in  a pack battling it out. Going like stink, having a blast. Best race of the day by far. Does a novice level rider have any business on the track at that time just because he doesn’t want the word Novice on his plaque at the end of the year? To me that answer is absolutely not. A mobile road block in the middle of the corner when that pack comes around spells disaster in any sense. It spoils the racing, forces people to make bad decisions at high rates of speed. And ultimately gives those riders a bad experience that was avoidable. 

Flip side of that coin, if I see a rider that is signed up as novice, but yet is leading all the intermediate riders, just because he wants a first place for the day, I’m gonna move him up on the spot. I have done it, and I am sure will have to do it again.

Here’s the bottom line, Median age of riders in this series is 43 years old. Average bike is over 30. Average skill level of MOVMX riders compared to MoState riders? Well let’s just say there will not be any challenge races coming up soon.

One of my jobs is to try to keep the racing as fair and safe as possible. I make some mistakes from time to time, but I think the track record speaks for itself. This series is doing very well going into its 17th year in keeping with the farm field racing attitude of competition. So there is no room here for grudges, bad attitudes, or grievances held in contempt. If there is a problem, you know how and where to find me to discuss it.

All of that being said, we are still racers and we want to win. So if you want to ride with a faster bunch of guys, be a Jeremy. Work at it, try harder, get faster.

Every body have a great Thanksgiving, Kiss your wife, hug your children, and pet your dogs. They are the reason you have something called a home, and isn’t that what really matters?

h2bg

 

 

 

Practice changes. Due to changing face of the machinery used in MOVMX it has come time for a couple of safety changes. The first one I will talk about here. There will be a new practice order implemented this year, This is largely due to the large number of novice riders and the speed differences of a 74 machine compared to that of an 89. The format should be very easy for everyone to understand.

Practice 1: All liquid cooled machines with Expert and Intermediate riders.
Practice 2: All air cooled machines with Expert and Intermediate riders.
Practice 3: All liquid cooled machines with Novice riders.
Practice 4: All air cooled machines with Novice riders.
Practice 5: All youth classes 65cc and up
Practice 6: All Peewee.

If you can't quite grasp which practice you are in follow these instructions. 1. Do you have to put coolant in the radiator? 2. Re-read practice order.

There will still be two rounds of practice per event on race day. Almost every event will have Saturday full practice.

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New Classes and re-introducing Youth Classes. Due to the popularity if the later years classes, I am adding a +40 for the Ultima II riders.

And some where along the lines, the youth vintage classes got deleted from the website. Since there has been interest in them again lately I have modified a little and added the mini class. As with all things MOVMX, as they grow and need changed, I will make those changes on the fly.

Ultima II +40: Riders aver the age of 40 on Disc brake machines. Will be divided Novice, Intermediate and Expert.

Youth Vintage Mini: Air Cooled machines up to 83. Up to 80cc

Youth Vintage 100: Twin Shock, air cooled 100cc machines up to 80

2015 Schedule is also now available at
http://www.movmx.com/2013-race-schedule.html

More changes and updates will be happening soon.

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